1900-2000

9 March 1901: Japanese Right to Vote
Naturalized Japanese won the right to vote in their successful appeal of the BC Elections Act.
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1902: Royal Commission on Chinese and Japanese Immigration
The federal government appointed a Royal Commission on Chinese and Japanese Immigration, which concluded that the Asians were "unfit for full citizenship ... obnoxious to a free community and dangerous to the state."
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1903: Chinese Head Tax Increased to $500
After the 1903 session of Parliament passed legislation raising the head tax to $500, the number of Chinese who paid the fee in the first fiscal year dropped from 4719 to 8.
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20 January 1904: Disallowance of Chinese Ban
The Canadian government disallowed a BC Act restricting Chinese immigration to that province.
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October 1906: The Suian Maru Voyagers
In October 1906, the Japanese vessel Suian Maru landed at Beecher Bay, on Vancouver Island. The group of 80 men and 3 women subsequently settled on Don and Lion islands near Richmond, BC. They worked in the fishing industry until the 1942 Japanese Internment. In October 2006, Richmond city council unveiled a plaque commemorating the Suian Maru voyagers.
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7 September 1907: Anti-Asian Riot
Several hundred people rioted through Vancouver's Asian district to protest Asian immigration to Canada. Discriminatory legislation and social practices in BC denied Chinese, Japanese and South Asians the right to vote, practise law or pharmacy, be elected to public office, serve on juries, or work in education or the civil service. Public opinion resulted on several occasions in violent anti-Asian riots.
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1907: The Khalsa Diwan
The Vancouver Khalsa Diwan Society was created in 1907 and through its leadership, Sikhs built their first permanent temple or gurdwara ("gateway to the guru") the following year.
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1907-08: The Hayashi-Lemieux Gentlemen’s Agreement
In 1907, at Canada's insistence, Japan limited the migration of males to Canada to 400 per year. As a result, most immigrants thereafter were women joining their husbands or unmarried women who were betrothed to men in Canada.
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1907: South Asian Immigration Banned
An Order in Council banned immigration from India and South Asian countries. The population of South Asians in Canada would drop to roughly 2000, the majority being Sikh. Though wives and children of legal Sikh residents were allowed entry to the country in the 1920s, it would not be until the late 1940s that the policies were changed to allow for full South Asian immigration to Canada.
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1908: Japanese Gardens in Canada
Isaburo Kishida, a noted professional gardener and park designer from Yokohama, designed four Japanese gardens in or near Victoria. Two are still extant; a rock garden in the Butchart Gardens, 1908, and the Japanese Garden at Hatley Park National Historic Site, originally created in 1909 and expanded in 1913.
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16 September 1912: Vancouver Coal Strike
Miners at Cumberland, BC, declared a "holiday" to protest the firing of Oscar Mottishaw. Canadian Collieries locked them out and hired Chinese and recruits from Britain and the US as strikebreakers.

May 1914: The Komagata Maru arrives in Vancouver Harbour
In 1914, almost 400 Indians aboard the immigrant ship Komagata Maru languished in Vancouver Harbour while Canadian authorities debated what to do with them. Canada's new navy, in action for the first time, escorted the ship from Canadian waters while many Vancouver residents cheered approvingly from shore.
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First World War (1914-1918)

1916-1917: Japanese Canadians in the First World War
Although the federal government did not support the enlistment of first generation Japanese immigrants during the First World War, some Issei men persisted and in 1916, the first group was sent overseas. Of the 222 men who served, 54 were killed and 13 men received the Military Medal of Bravery.

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POST-WAR

1919: Reduction of Japanese Fishing Licences
In 1919, Japanese fishermen controlled more than 3200 fishing licences. The Department of Fisheries reduced the number of licences issued to people other than white residents, British subjects and Canadian First Nations, and by 1925 Japanese fishermen would lose close to 1000 licences.

1923: Gentlemen’s Agreement Amendment
An amendment to the 1908 Hayashi-Lemieux agreement reduced the number of male Japanese immigrants to a maximum of 150 annually. In 1928, the Gentlemen’s Agreement was amended further to include women and children in the count of 150.
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1 July 1923: Humiliation Day
Known to many Canadian Chinese as Humiliation Day, the Chinese Immigration Act was replaced by legislation that virtually suspended Chinese immigration. The discriminatory legislation would not be repealed until 1947.
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1931: Japanese Veterans Given Right to Vote
In 1931, the federal government granted the franchise to Issei veterans. They were the first Japanese Canadians given the right to vote.
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29 May 1933: Chinese Soccer Team Wins
The Chinese Students Soccer Team of Vancouver, B.C. won the prestigious Mainland Cup, indicative of Lower Mainland soccer supremacy, and became heroes for the long suffering Chinese community who experienced severe institutional racism and economic depression. In September 2011, the team was inducted into the BC Sports Hall of Fame.
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1936: Japanese Request Franchise
In 1936, a delegation of Japanese Canadians travelled to Ottawa to speak before the Special Committee on Elections and Franchise Acts. Despite their presentation, the federal government upheld the denial of the franchise.
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Second World War (1939-1945)

1939-1945: Japanese Canadians and the Second World War
Despite Canadian citizenship, Japanese Canadians were excluded from military service. Several second generation (Nisei) Japanese fought to enlist before and during the Second World War; however, only 32 Nisei (most of whom lived outside of BC) were allowed to enlist in regular service. In 1945, an additional 119 Nisei men, most of whom had been expelled from their homes in BC and whose families were in detention sites, enlisted in the Canadian Intelligence Corps.
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March to August 1941: Compulsory Registration
Everyone of Japanese descent over 16 years old was required by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to register.
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18 September 1941: Vancouver Asahi Play Last Game 
The Vancouver Asahi played their last baseball game as the Japanese community was banished to exile on farms and internment camps.
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7 December 1941: Attack on Pearl Harbor
Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December, 38 Japanese-Canadians were arrested as subversives. The federal government used the War Measures Act 12 weeks after the attack to order the removal of all Japanese Canadians residing within 160 kilometers of the Pacific coast. About 20,000 Japanese Canadians in BC, 75% of whom were Canadian citizens, were fingerprinted, issued identification cards and removed from their homes. More than 8000 were moved to a temporary detention camp (where women and children were held in a livestock building) at the Pacific National Exhibition Grounds in Vancouver.
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8 December 1941: Japanese Attack Hong Kong
The Japanese attacked the mainland (Kowloon) side of Hong Kong, and Hong Kong itself on 18 December. Hong Kong surrendered on 25 December. Numerous Canadians were killed or died in Japanese prison camps.
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8 December 1941: Canada Declares War on Japan
Canada joined Great Britain and the US in declaring war on Japan after the Japanese attacked the American Pacific fleet at Pearl Harbor on 7 December.
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26 February 1942: Japanese Relocation
The federal government announced that all people of Japanese origin living in the coastal regions of British Columbia would be relocated to the BC interior or inland farming areas.
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3 March 1942: Birth of Menaka Thakkar
Dancer Menaka Thakkar was born at Bombay, India.
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20 June 1942: Japanese Shell BC Coast
A Japanese submarine fired a few shells at Estevan Point on Vancouver Island, with no damage.
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1943-1946: Japanese Property Sold
Between 1943 and 1946, the federal government sold all Japanese Canadian-owned property—homes, farms, fishing boats, businesses and personal property—and deducted from the proceeds any social assistance received by the owner while confined and unemployed in a detention camp.
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14 March 1944: Ontario Passes Racial Discrimination Act
Ontario was the first province to respond to social change when it passed the Racial Discrimination Act of 1944. This landmark legislation effectively prohibited the publication and display of any symbol, sign or notice that expressed ethnic, racial or religious discrimination. It was followed by other sweeping legislation.
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2 September 1945: Japanese Formally Surrender
The formal surrender of the Japanese took place on the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, bringing the Second World War to a close. Altogether 1,086,771 Canadians, including 49,252 women, served in the armed forces. Total fatalities were 41,992.
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POST-WAR

1945: Immigration and Labour Demand
At war's end, Canadian immigration regulations remained unchanged from the restrictive prewar years. But with a great demand for labour, Canada gradually re-opened its doors to European immigration; first to immigrants Canada traditionally preferred—those from the United Kingdom and Western Europe—but eventually to the rest of Europe as well. Immigration from Eastern Europe came to a halt, however, as borders to the west were closed by the Soviet Union and its Cold War allies.
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1946: Protest against Deportation of Japanese Canadians
In 1946, after the war was over, the government attempted to deport 10,000 Japanese Canadians to Japan but was stopped by a massive public protest from all parts of Canada. Nevertheless, 4000 Japanese Canadians, more than half of whom were Canadian citizens, were deported to Japan.
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1947: Chinese Discrimination Repealed
Discriminatory legislation placing restrictions on Chinese immigration was repealed, although it was not entirely removed until 1967.
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1947: Chinese Get Right to Vote
Chinese and East Asian Canadians gained the vote federally and provincially.
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1 April 1949: Japanese Canadians Given Franchise
Japanese Canadians were given the franchise and the legal restrictions used to control the movement of Japanese Canadians were removed. With their freedom re-established, some moved back to British Columbia, but due to the hardships suffered, most Japanese Canadians who were expelled from the coast did not return. With the extension of the federal franchise to Japanese Canadians, the last statutory disenfranchisement of Asians was removed. The Chinese had been given the right to vote in 1947.
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30 July 1949: Birth of Alexina Louie
Composer Alexina Louie, influenced by her Chinese cultural heritage, became one of the leading composers of Canada's post-Second World War generation. She was born at Vancouver.
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4 December 1950: Canadians Evacuate Americans in Korea
HMCS Athabascan and HMCS Cayuga evacuated American troops and bombard the port of Chinnampo, Korea.
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18 December 1950: First Canadians in Korea
The first Canadian troops to arrive in Korea, the 2nd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, landed at Pusan.
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24-25 April 1951: Kap‘Yong Valley
Canadian troops defended the Kap'Yong River Valley in Korea against a Chinese attack, at the cost of 10 dead and 23 wounded.
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25 May 1952: Koje-Do
A company of the Royal Canadian Regiment was sent to Koje-Do, Korea, and without bloodshed helped to reorganize part of the troubled camp and guard its prisoners.
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10 June 1957: First Chinese Canadian Elected to Federal Office
Douglas Jung was elected Conservative MP for a Vancouver riding, becoming the first Chinese Canadian to hold elected federal office.
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1960s–1970s: Refugees and Canada
During the 1960s and 1970s Canada responded to the plight of refugees from troubled areas. In the aftermath of the unsuccessful Hungarian uprising of 1967 and the crushing of political reform in Czechoslovakia by the Soviet Union in 1973, refugees fled westward. Canada set aside its normal immigration procedures to admit its share of refugees. In the years that followed, Canada again made special allowance for refugees from political upheavals in Uganda, Chile and elsewhere. In each of these cases, however, the refugees were admitted as an exception to the immigration regulations and without following all the usual immigration procedures.
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October 1967: Immigration "Points System"
Prior to 1967, the immigration system relied largely on immigration officers' judgment to determine who should be eligible to enter Canada. Deputy Minister of Immigration Tom Kent established a points system, which assigned points in nine categories, to determine eligibility. Ethnic groups all across Canada endorsed the new selection process.
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1967: Second Wave of Japanese Immigration
The second wave of Japanese immigration began in 1967 as a result of the “points system.” Many Japanese immigrants who came to Canada during this period worked in the service or skilled trades sectors.
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October 1971: Trudeau Introduces Canada's Multicultural Policy
Canada's multiculturalism policy grew partly in reaction to the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism, which endorsed a "bicultural Canada," barely recognizing "other ethnic groups." This dilemma was partially resolved in 1971 by Prime Minister Trudeau's assertion that Canada was a "multicultural country with two official languages."
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1971: Majority of Immigrants Non-European
The last vestiges of racial discrimination in immigration were gone from Canadian immigration legislation and regulations by the late 1960s. This opened Canada's doors to many of those who would previously have been rejected as “undesirable.” In 1971, for the first time in Canadian history, the majority of those immigrating into Canada were of non-European ancestry.
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7 December 1973: CANDU Deal with South Korea
Canada sold a CANDU reactor to South Korea.
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8 January 1974: UBC Asian Centre
Construction began on the Asian Centre at the University of British Columbia. The building was donated to the people of the province by Sanyo Corp and other sponsors in honour of BC's centennial.
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18 May 1974: India Detonates Nuclear Device
India detonated a nuclear device using Canadian radioactive materials.
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22 May 1974: Canada Suspends Nuclear Exports
The Canadian government suspended shipments of all nuclear equipment and materials to India, after India detonated a nuclear device.
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1975: The Fall of the Thieu Regime
The American defeat in Vietnam and the fall of the Thieu regime in early 1975 led to a mass flight of Vietnamese, about 6500 of whom were admitted to Canada as political refugees. By the end of 1978 there were 10,000 Indochinese in Canada; most were in Montréal, Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. About 80% were ethnic Vietnamese, and most men were professionals, bureaucrats, military personnel or students.
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1978: New Immigration Act and Refugees
In 1978, Canada enacted a new Immigration Act that affirmed Canada's commitment to the resettlement of refugees from oppression. Refugees would no longer be admitted to Canada as an exception to immigration regulations. Admission of refugees was now part of Canadian immigration law and regulations.
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November 1978: The Hai Hong
In 1978, Canada accepted 604 refugees from the freighter Hai Hong. The situation of the "boat" people and of Lao, Khmer and Vietnamese "land people" who fled to Thailand grew increasingly severe, and in response Canada took in 59,970 refugee and designated-class immigrants during the next two years.
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30 September 1979: W5’s "Campus Giveaway"
CTV’s W5 program made the allegation that foreign students were taking the place of white Canadians in such career-related university programs as pharmacy, engineering and medicine. Since the "foreign faces" in the report were Chinese, W5's implication was that all students of Chinese origin were foreigners, and that Canadian taxpayers were subsidizing Chinese students - in spite of the fact that almost all of the identified students were Canadian citizens. Sixteen anti-W5 committees from Victoria to Halifax mobilized the Chinese population and secured a vague apology from CTV.
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1980s: Illegally Stranded Refugees
The refugee issue was dramatically brought home to Canadians in the late 1980s, when two ships illegally stranded their respective cargoes of Sikh and Tamil refugee claimants on Canada's East Coast. Amid greatly exaggerated fears that Canada was about to be flooded with refugees, Parliament and immigration authorities began tightening up refugee regulations and procedures.
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1980s: Southeast Asian Refugees
The first major refugee resettlement program under the new immigration legislation of 1978 came during the early 1980s, when Canada led the Western world in its welcome to Southeast Asian refugees and particularly those from Vietnam, often referred to as the "boat people." Many had escaped Vietnam in tiny boats and found themselves confined to refugee camps in Thailand or Hong Kong awaiting permanent homes.
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1981: First Filipino Elected
Conrado Santos became the first Filipino to be elected to office when he was elected to the Manitoba Assembly for the New Democratic Party.
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1981: Kagawa’s Obasan Published
In 1981, Joy Kogawa’s Obasan, the first novel to trace the internment and dispersal of 20,000 Japanese Canadians from the West Coast during the Second World War is published. Kogawa was made a member of the Order of Canada in 1986. In 2006, her family's original Vancouver home was purchased by the Land Conservancy of British Columbia, and saved from imminent demolition, a testament to the significance of Kogawa's work for the history and culture of British Columbia.
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23 May 1983: Death of Tsutae Sato
Tsutae Sato died at Vancouver, aged 92. He arrived in Canada in 1917 to teach at the Japanese Citizens School. He and his wife established scholarships in Japanese studies at the University of British Columbia. In 1978, Sato was awarded the Order of Canada.

23 October 1983: Dedication of Guan-Yin Buddhist Temple
The Guan-Yin Buddhist Temple (also known as the International Buddhist Temple) in Richmond, BC, was dedicated. Designed by architect Vincent Kwan, it is the most architecturally authentic Chinese imperial-style Buddhist temple in North America.
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19 December 1984: Hong Kong Invests in Vancouver
Britain signed over its colony of Hong Kong to China. Because of the uncertainly of what China would do with Hong Kong and its wealth, the affluent and middle class of Hong Kong began to leave. This began a period of immigration from Hong Kong to Canada that lasted until the early 1990s.
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1985: Canada’ New Immigration Policy
Canada changed its immigration policy to expand the list of business immigrants to include investors, entrepreneurs and those who are self-employed. This led to increased immigration from Hong Kong where people had begun to leave after Britain agreed to transfer its colony to China in 1997, and to a lesser extent from Taiwan.

23 June 1985: Air India Disaster
The worst air disaster associated with Canada and the world's deadliest terrorist attack before 11 September 2001, was carried out by terrorists who bombed Air India Flight 182 from Toronto. The plane crashed into the North Atlantic off the coast of Ireland, killing all 329 on board.

1988-1993: Hong Kong Immigrants
Between 1988 and 1993, 166,487 Hong Kong immigrants settled in Canada, with Ontario (50.57%) and BC (26.7%) receiving the bulk of these new Canadians; by 2001, 82% of people of Chinese origin lived in one of these two provinces.
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1988: First Filipino MP Elected
Dr Rey D. Pagtakhan, a Liberal from Manitoba, became the first elected Filipino Member of Parliament.
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1988: Chan Hon Goh
In 1988, Chan Hon Goh became the first Canadian to win a silver medal at the prestigious Adeline Genée International Ballet competition in England.
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9 September 1988: See-Chai Lam Becomes BC’s Lieutenant Governor
The Honourable David See-Chai Lam was installed as BC's 25th lieutenant-governor. He was the first person of Asian ancestry to hold a vice-regal post in Canada.
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22 September 1988: Redress to Japanese Canadians
Prime Minister Brian Mulroney acknowledged the wartime wrongs committed against Japanese Canadians and announced compensation for each individual who had been expelled from the coast, was born before 1 April 1949 and was alive at the time of the signing of the agreement. The compensation also provided a community fund to rebuild the infrastructure of the destroyed communities, pardons for those wrongfully convicted of disobeying orders under the War Measures Act, Canadian citizenship for those wrongfully deported to Japan and their descendants and funding for a Canadian Race Relations Foundation.
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8 November 1988: Ondaatje and the Order of Canada
Author Michael Ondaatje was invested as an Officer of the Order of Canada. The Sri Lankan-born highly acclaimed author emigrated from Sri Lanka and came to Canada through England in 1962. He became a Canadian citizen in 1965. Perhaps his most well-known work, The English Patient (1992) was awarded the Governor General's Award for fiction in 1992, and earned Ondaatje a share of the prestigious Booker Prize, the first ever awarded to a Canadian. A 1996 film version of the novel won nine Academy Awards.
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15 March 1990: Sikh Mounties Permitted to Wear Turbans
The Solicitor General of Canada, Pierre Cadieux, announced the decision in the Baltej Singh Dhillon case, allowing Sikh RCMP officers to wear a turban while in uniform.
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1 July 1997: Hong Kong Handover
After 156 years as a British colony, Hong Kong was returned to China. Many people left Hong Kong in the years leading up to the transfer. Canada, with the main destinations being Toronto and Vancouver, saw increased immigration in the mid 1980s and early 1990s. Unlike earlier Chinese immigrants, those from Hong Kong were educated and generally wealthy.
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1988: Vivienne Poy appointed to the Senate
Author, entrepreneur, fashion designer, and historian, Vivienne Poy, became the first Canadian of Asian descent to be appointed to the Senate of Canada.
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17 February 1998: Race Statistics Released
Statistics Canada released the results of its controversial question on race showing that the percentage of Canadians of neither white nor aboriginal identify themselves as visible minorities, of whom 27% were Chinese, 21% South Asians and 18% blacks.
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9 September 1999: Migrant Ship Seized
A fourth ship of illegal Chinese migrants was seized by the Canadian navy in Nootka Sound.
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7 October 1999: Adrienne Clarkson
Adrienne Clarkson took office as Canada’s governor general. Prime Minister Jean Chrétien appointed Clarkson marking several "firsts" in the selection of Canada's governor general: she was the first without a military background and the first non-white Canadian to be appointed to the vice-regal position.
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